A Rare Infection Has Awoken – Experts Warns Contact Lens Wearers

A Rare Infection Has Awoken - Experts Warns Contact Lens Wearers
People diagnosed with the infection are mostly left with about 25 percent of their sight

 

A very rare infection known as Acanthamoeba keratitis has started making waves. This infection affects the cornea and wearing contact lens doubles the chances of this infection

The Moorfields Eye Hospital in London says the infection is as a result of  “a microscopic organism called Acanthamoeba, which is common in nature and is usually found in bodies of water” like stream, rivers, tap water, swimming pools, lakes, soil, and even air.

Within the past years, the hospital has seen an increasing number of people with the infection, Acanthamoeba keratitis. It has risen from 10 cases annually in England to about 65  and still increasing.

 

A research conducted in 2002 determined that in south-east England there were around 2.5 cases per 100,000 contact lens wearers. A Rare Infection Has Awoken – Experts warns contact lens wearers

Benedict Allen: Thinks We Are Explorers By Nature, Are You?

A recent study from University College London (UCL) and Moorfields, unfortunately, almost triples the figure.

People diagnosed with the infection are mostly left with about 25 percent of their sight and may become blind after the infection has been treated and its cleared.

From the research result, those who get infected are mostly people who wear reusable contacts,  people with ineffective contact lens solution, people who exhibit poor hygiene or those that have contaminated their lenses with water.

Proud Experts Unveil The New Drug Found To Cure Cancer

A Professor, from the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology,  John Dart, stated: “This increase in cases highlights the need for contact lens users to be aware of the risks.”

“People who wear reusable contact lenses need to make sure they thoroughly wash and dry their hands before handling contact lenses, and avoid wearing them while swimming, face washing or bathing.”

He added that using daily disposable lenses “may be safer” as they “eliminate the need for contact lens cases or solutions”.

Researchers are working towards establishing the risk factor for this type of lens.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *